Vitry-sur-Seine: Presentation of La Kunda, new autonomous social center

Since February 2020, we are about fifty people – precarious, undocumented, students – to occupy a plot of land with three buildings in Vitry-sur-Seine. This place, empty for less than a year, owned by the Val-de-Marne, was a home and the headquarters of a company of land shareholders in the department. We chose to call it La Kunda (the community in Soninké).
Why squatting it? The squatter responds first of all to the need, for some of us, to have decent housing and for others, quite simply, to have a home. We refuse precarious work in order to pay a rent that is too expensive, just as we refuse the blackmail of the real estate market and social institutions.
Some of us are undocumented, and follow long procedures that leave them on the street, without housing and without the possibility of working. Without the squat, it is the street, and everyone knows the difficulties of the street. Thanks to these places, some of us can go to school, move forward and have a place to live. [Read More]

Paris: families living on the streets sleep in front of the Prefecture

After a month of alerts to the services of the Paris City Hall and the Ile-de-France Prefecture remained unanswered, 107 exiled families living on the streets settled on Monday August 31 on the forecourt of the City Hall to put an end to this unworthy situation. The objective: to obtain permanent accommodation for all of them.

Since 2015, the public authorities have shown their inability to provide a dignified welcome for exiled people arriving in Paris, in defiance of their legal obligations. Among these people are many families and single women whose time spent on the streets is constantly increasing before they are offered care.

Every evening since 2017, the association Utopia 56 has been trying as best it can to make up for these state and municipal shortcomings via a network of solidarity-based shelters. This network is made up of about 250 people living in the Ile-de-France region who take in single women, families and couples living on the streets. [Read More]

Paris: about 300 people live under the A1 highway bridge

“Every morning, the police tell us to get out”.

Barely a month after the expulsion from the Aubervilliers camp, about 300 people live in a camp set up in Saint-Denis, under the A1 highway bridge. Far from food and clothing distributions, they also suffer from police harassment.

There is anger this Friday morning in the voices and faces of the men who have been living in the camp that has been set up for a little less than a month in Saint-Denis, under the A1 highway bridge.

As every morning, the police came by at about 6 a.m. and ordered the people installed on the esplanade that stretches out in front of the tricolor letters “UEFA Euro 2016” to “get out”.

Only the tents installed on the dirt slope between the road and the esplanade are allowed to stay. The camp is contained in the most invisible and most dangerous part of this place in any point uninhabitable. [Read More]

Paris: rue du Croissant, re-housing of all occupants within one year

The eviction will not take place! Residents will leave the building on Thursday, August 27 from 8:30 am: They will be re-housed in HLM by the City and the Prefecture and accommodated until then.

The 31 homeless households/families who have been occupying 18 rue du Croissant Paris 2e since January 1st 2020, have won their case: a commitment to rehouse all the occupants within a year by the Prefecture and the City of Paris was agreed at the beginning of the week, with DAL and the occupants.

A particularly severe judgment, handed down on July 2nd, ordering the immediate eviction of the occupants, as well as the involvement of the Prefecture of Police in the procedure (it was the former police station of the 2nd arrondissement) raised the imminent risk of eviction.

This is why the occupants and DAL had proposed as early as July 10 to leave the building as soon as possible on the condition that they would be housed until they were re-housed, organized anti-eviction pickets every morning to give the alarm in case, and throughout the summer, called the new government and the regional prefecture. The city of Paris had agreed to house some of the occupants. [Read More]

Saint-Denis: Two weeks after the eviction from Aubervilliers camp, hundreds of migrants return home

Between 300 and 400 migrants live under the bridge of the A1 motorway in Saint-Denis in totally undignified conditions, only fifteen days after the eviction from the Aubervilliers camp. The associations denounce an absurd situation where evictions and resettlements follow one another without any lasting solution.

At the time of the eviction from the Aubervilliers camp on 29 July, Pierre Henry, the director general of France Terre d’Asile, had said to himself “See you in September”, certain that the camp would be re-formed in a few weeks.

We didn’t have to wait that long. Less than a fortnight after the eviction of the 1,500 or so people living in the camp, “between 300 and 400” people found refuge under the A1 motorway bridge at Saint-Denis. They are single men, mostly from Afghanistan.

Among them, some “missed the eviction of Aubervilliers, others had an administrative appointment that day and could not be present”, says Maël, a member of the association Utopia 56 who did not want his surname to be made public. Among these hundreds of exiles, there are also newcomers who only found this unhealthy place to settle. [Read More]

Paris: eviction of the young migrants camp set up in Jules Ferry Square

The camp, which housed more than 70 young people considered by several associations as foreign minors, in the Jules Ferry square in the centre of Paris, was evicted Tuesday morning. The young people were directed to a gymnasium and hotels.

After more than a month camping in the Square Jules Ferry in central Paris, some 70 young migrants who claim to be minors were evicted on Tuesday 4 August.
The eviction, which was carried out peacefully, ended at around 8:30 a.m. With masks on their faces, the young people were accompanied on buses by agents of the Ile-de-France prefecture and the Paris City Hall, under the watchful eye of a few police officers standing back. An eviction order had been posted by the police on Sunday evening in the camp.
Forty-eight young people were taken to the Japy gymnasium in the 11th arrondissement. Thirty others, more vulnerable due to medical conditions – including seven young girls – were housed in social hotels.
Evaluated as adults by several departments, the young men present in the camp are currently awaiting their appeal against this evaluation. In the meantime, no accommodation arrangements are planned for them. [Read More]

Paris: Eviction from the Saint-Denis Canal migrant camp

Nearly 1,500 migrants were “sheltered” on Wednesday when they were expelled from the Aubervilliers camp north of Paris. The associations fear the reformation of a camp within a few weeks. They denounce the repeated dismantling without any real solution.

The migrant camp located along the Saint-Denis canal in Aubervilliers, in the north of Paris, was evicted on Wednesday 29 July. As early as 6am, a large police presence squared the area, where nearly 1,500 people were settled.

“This operation is the logical continuation of all the operations we have been carrying out for several months,” Paris police prefect Didier Lallement, who was present at the scene, told reporters. “I wanted to evacuate the camps on the outskirts of Paris and make sure that migrants do not gather in the camps for the entire Paris police force and the three neighbouring departments” he added. [Read More]

Paris: At the Saint-Denis canal camp, migrants are “left to die”

This Wednesday, July 29th, the camp of the Saint-Denis canal in Aubervilliers should be dismantled by the authorities announced associations helping migrants. The camp welcomes more than 1200 people in extremely precarious conditions. An eviction which is nothing new, the “sheltering” or “evacuations”, in the words of the authorities, is repeated tirelessly in France. A problem that the authorities refuse to tackle.

Between Aubervilliers and Saint Denis, along the canal, Brahim comes out of his tent crushed by the sun. He explains that he has been there for 3 months, with his wife and his newborn baby. Like the others, he lines up in spite of the heat to get antibacterial hand gel, masks, T-shirts and a bit of shampoo. An aid distributed by the association Utopia 56, Brahim, desperate, searches the five boxes of old clothes lying on the quayside: “this place is not possible for my child” he explains, “it’s just not possible. Is this Europe? France is like Africa?! My life is shattered. “The rule: one health kit, one T-shirt, one pair of pants per person, no more. Everyone has to be able to help themselves. In the end, nearly 150 people take advantage of the distribution, but soon the stocks leave. There are only too big pants left. [Read More]

Paris: Dramatic growth of informal migrant camp at Aubervilliers

In just one month, the number of migrants living in the Aubervilliers camp in the Paris region has more than doubled, from 400 in mid-June to around 1,000 in mid-July. While arrivals are expected to continue over the next few weeks, NGOs denounce the failure of the French reception system.

In the Aubervilliers camp, the number of migrants has more than doubled in just one month. In mid-June, aid groups estimated that there were around 400 people living under the Stains bridge along the Saint-Denis canal in the north of Paris. In mid-July, France Land of Asylum (FTDA) said it counted some 1,000 migrants in the camp.

“And by August, there will be at least 1,500 of them,” predicted FTDA Director General Pierre Henry. “It’s always the same thing, we’ve been going in circles for years,” he said. [Read More]

Montreuil (Paris-banlieue): eviction of l’Écharde

07:25am, Wednesday 27th of March 2019:

Eviction of l’Écharde, 19 rue Garibaldi, in Montreuil (Paris, métro Robespierre). Come now to support the squatters!

Gathering tonight against all evictions, at 07:00pm , at the end of avenue de la Résistance, in Montreuil (métro Croix-de-Chavaux).

Trespass Journal Issue Three

We’re glad to finally present Issue 3 of Trespass Journal!

In this issue, which is online and freely distributed, you’ll find a translation from English to Dutch of a journal article about how a moral panic was generated to enforce the criminalisation of squatting in the Netherlands and a translation to French of a brief text about migration on Idomeni in Greece, near to Macedonia, which was previously published in Trespass 2 in Italian.

As interventions in five languages, we have an analysis of the lack of support to the ZAD in Brittany, plus short pieces about the opening of a new anarchist social centre in the Paris suburbs, community resistance to preserve a park in London, the demolition of a community gym in Athens, an (unsuccessful) eviction threat in Catania, and an eviction in Catalonia. And a report on the resquat of the watertower in Utrecht! There’s plenty more news and analysis on this website.
[Read More]

Montreuil (Paris-banlieue): opening of l’Écharde

Monday October 1st, 2018, while Jardin d’Alice‘s docile artists were giving back their building’s keys (at 19 rue Garibaldi, in Montreuil), about thirty people came to disrupt their plans, occupying the building. After three years of caretaking, this space was about to be given back to Nexity, French “master” of property business, who is managing the building on behalf of the EPFIF (Public Land Office of the Paris region). While the state is trying to empty the meaning of housing struggles by signing precarious occupancy agreements to artists (like Jardin d’Alice) and zadists, while the left-wing mayors talk about requisitioning to scrounge a few ballot papers, we, like many others, are squatting. [Read More]